Sealing the Border documents violations of the rights and dignity of migrants and asylum-seekers by immigration enforcement agencies and officials in the El Paso and Southern New Mexico region of the borderlands.

The idea of sanctuary often centers on civil immigration enforcement, but it can and should be much broader. Many communities pass “welcoming city” or similar policies with statements about how their local agencies will treat all people with respect, regardless of national origin, race, religious affiliation, gender identity, or difference in ability.

About 60 million people around the globe have been forced to leave their homes to escape war, violence and persecution.

Bishop Mark J. Seitz, bishop of the Catholic Diocese of El Paso, published a pastoral letter entitled, “Sorrow and Mourning Flee Away: Pastoral Letter on Migration to the People of God in the Diocese of El Paso.”

Migrant: Stories of Hope and Resilience presents a range of migrant accounts that encourage readers to identify with the challenges migrants face, question assumptions about their lives and reasons for migrating, and tackle the complicated questions posed by our current immigration system.

What does the Bible say about helping refugees, migrants and foreigners? Fr. James Martin, S.J., explains that it’s pretty clear.

Catholic leaders, including Cardinal Peter Turkson and Archbishop José Gomez, reflect on Church teaching related to welcoming refugees.

A collection of prayers related to migration assembled by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

“Recovering the Human Face of Immigration in the U.S. South” is a joint collaboration between the Program for Immigration, Religion, and Social Change (PlRSC) at the University of Florida’s Center for Latin American Studies and the Jesuit Social Research Institute (JSRI) at Loyola University New Orleans.